Call For Submission is now Closed, by next new wave

352 Submissions are received for SeaShorts Competition.

The selection committee had been reviewing the film. The selection will be announced after 15th July 2019.

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Call For Submission started from 1st May 2019 and ended on 15th June 2019.

Call For Submission started from 1st May 2019 and ended on 15th June 2019.

There are two competitions for the SeaShorts Film Festival:

SeaShorts Competition

Open to Southeast Asian filmmakers.
20 short films will be selected for this competition.

CRITERIA FOR SEASHORTS AWARD

1. Director(s) must be from Southeast Asia.
2. The short film submitted must not have premiered in any film festival before 1st June 2018.
3. Country of production: Southeast Asian countries (fulfilled by at least three of these: film locations, core team members, main cast, or funding)
4. Film duration of not more than 30 minutes, including credits.

Jury Members:

Next New Wave Competition

Open to Malaysian filmmakers.
10 short films will be selected for this competition.

CRITERIA FOR NEXT NEW WAVE AWARD

1. Director(s) must be from Malaysia.
2. The short film submitted must not have premiered in any film festival before 1st June 2018.
3. Country of production: Malaysia (fulfilled by at least three of these: film locations, core team members, main cast, or funding)
4. Film duration not more than 30 minutes, including credits.

Jury Members:

ANNOUNCING SECOND JURY MEMBER FOR NEXT NEW WAVE AWARD: Sherman Ong by next new wave

10 Malaysian short films will be selected for Next New Wave Competition. The deadline for submission is June 15th, 5 more days to go!

Submit at:
http://www.nextnewwave.com.my/call-for-submission


About Sherman Ong

Sherman.jpg

Sherman born in Malacca! He is a filmmaker, photographer and visual artist. His practice has always centred on the human condition and our relationships with others within the larger milieu.

Winner of the Prudential Eye Awards 2015 for Photography and the ICON de Martell Cordon Bleu Photography Award 2010, Sherman has premiered works in Art Biennales, major Film Festivals and Museums around the world, including the Venice, Singapore, Yin Chuan, Jakarta Biennales, Fukuoka and Asia Pacific Triennale, Mori Art Museum Tokyo, Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, The Tate Modern, Martin-Gropius-Bau Berlin, Musee du Quai Branly Paris, Centre Pompidou Paris, Institute of Contemporary Arts London, Noorderlicht Photo Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, VideoBrasil Contemporary Art Festival, Singapore Art Museum and MART Museum of Contemporary Art of Trento and Rovereto, Italy.

He is a founding member of 13 Little Pictures, a film collective based in Singapore. He also serves on the committee of the Singapore International Photography Festival, as an educator at schools and universities, and was an Associate Artist of the Substation.

In the summer of 2017, he exhibited in SUNSHOWER: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia (1980s to Now) co-organsied by the National Art Center, Tokyo, the Mori Art Museum, and the Japan Foundation Asia Center in Tokyo, Japan.

Come to to visit Sherman's hometown in SeaShorts 2019! You can watch film with him and join his art installation during our Festival!

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Submit your short films to SeaShorts!

CRITERIA FOR NEXT NEW WAVE AWARD

1. Director(s) must be from Malaysia.

2. The short film submitted had not been premiered in any film festival before 1st June 2018.

3. Country of production: Malaysia ( fulfilled by at least three of these: film locations, core team members, main casts, or funding)

4. Short Film Duration not more than 30 minutes, including credits.

http://www.nextnewwave.com.my/call-for-submission

ANNOUNCING HEAD OF JURY FOR NEXT NEW WAVE COMPETITION: GARIN NUGROHO by next new wave

Copy of HEAD OF JURY FOR NEXT NEW WAVE COMPETITION: GARIN NUGROHO

Garin Nugroho will head the jury for the Next New Wave Competition, a category for Malaysian filmmakers. Each year, 10 films are selected to compete for the Next New Wave Award.

Born in Jogjakarta, Garin Nugroho was a prominent filmmaker of the 1990s film generation in Indonesia and one of a few who were at the forefront of the liberation from New Order-era film industry regulations.

His early films, such as Cinta dalam Sepotong Roti (1991), Surat untuk Bidadari (1994), and Bulan Tertusuk Ilalang (1995), secured his place as Indonesia’s first director to attract serious interest in the international film festival scene.

We asked him exactly how many films he had made, he replied "Feature film 19 , documentary series tv : 30, documentary : 5, essay film : 7, short film : 3. theater live : 6, dance :2, book :5, Installation art : 3"

Among his film titles: Air dan Romi, Surat Untuk Bidadari, Leaf On The Pillow, Birdman's Tale, Opera Jawa, Under The Tree. His latest work is Memories of My Body (2018).

He studied cinematography at Institut Kesenian Jakarta (Jakarta Institute of the Arts) from 1981 to 1985 and learned a lot indirectly from the legendary Indonesian director Teguh Karya (1937-2001).

Garin also enjoyed exploring, and would bathe in the Code River fed by the cold lahar runoffs from Mount Merapi; he notes that the sulfur, which was brought to the river by the lava, was good for his skin!

Garin had made films in many parts of Indonesia, when asked how many island he covered? "So many islands : all big islands, many small islands."

Maybe someone had made a list somewhere in the internet.
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CRITERIA FOR NEXT NEW WAVE AWARD
1. Director(s) must be from Malaysia.

2. The short film submitted had not been premiered in any film festival before 1st June 2018.

3. Country of production: Malaysia ( fulfilled by at least three of these: film locations, core team members, main casts, or funding)

4. Short Film Duration not more than 30 minutes, including credits.

http://www.nextnewwave.com.my/call-for-submission

ANNOUNCING THIRD JURY MEMBER FOR SEASHORTS AWARD: Lee Chatametikool by next new wave

Lee is the most sought-after editor in Southeast Asia.

Lee is the most sought-after editor in Southeast Asia.

All 3 jury members for SeaShorts competition are announced: the head of jury Lav Diaz (Philippines), Bront Palarae (Malaysia), and last but not least, Lee Chatametikool (Thailand)!

20 short films from Southeast Asian countries will be selected for SeaShorts Competition. The deadline for submission is June 15th, 5 more days to go!
Submit at:
http://www.nextnewwave.com.my/call-for-submission

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About Lee Chatametikool

One of the best thing that happened in the Southeast Asia film history is this:

in 2001, Lee Chatametikool moved back to Bangkok from New York to work on Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s first narrative feature film, ‘Blissfully Yours’. He was not the editor at first, he was the sound man on set. And after shooting he also help with putting the rushes together, and eventually involved in the editing process, and became the editors of all Apitchapong's films after that.

Although mostly known as Apitchapong's editor, Lee has since worked alongside a new crop of young filmmakers in Thailand, editing the debut features for many up and coming directors, including a commercial suceess, Shutter.

In 2007, he won the Best Editor award for ‘Syndromes and a Century’ at the inaugural Asian Film Awards in Hong Kong. The Bangkok Film Critic’s Assembly awarded him for his work on ‘Wonderful Town’ in 2008.

In 2010, he won Best Editor for the second time from the Asian Film Awards for his work on Malaysian director Chris Chong's ‘Karaoke’.

Lee is the most sought-after editor in Southeast Asia. To date, he has 48 films credits under him, including Apprentice, Pop Aye, Malila: The Farewell Flower, Manta Ray, and Thailand 10 Years.

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Submit your short films to SeaShorts!
CRITERIA FOR SEASHORTS AWARD
1. Director(s) must be from Southeast Asia.
2. The short film submitted had not been premiered in any film festival before 1st June 2018.
3. Country of production: Southeast Asian countries ( fulfilled by at least three of these: film locations, core team members, main casts, or funding)
4. Short Film Duration not more than 30 minutes, including credits.

Deadline: 15th June 2019
Submit at:
http://www.nextnewwave.com.my/call-for-submission

ANNOUNCING SECOND JURY MEMBER FOR SEASHORTS AWARD: BRONT PALARAE by next new wave

Copy of SeaShorts2019 Jury: Bront Palarae

An actor, screenwriter, director and producer, Bront Palarae is born in Alor Star, Malaysia but he is a Southeast Asian actor / filmmaker.

He is of Malay, Punjabi-Pakistani and Thai ancestry. In Amir Muhammad's 2007 Apa Khabar Orang Kampung(Village People Radio Show), Bront was the voice of the Thai radio soap opera actor.

In year 2017, Bront acted in Pengabdi Setan (Satan's Slave), a remake of classic Indonesian horror film, his second collaboration with Joko Anwar after HBO Asia's Halfworlds series. Pengabdi Setan became the highest-grossing film in Indonesia for 2017.

Palarae is also working on a film called THE LIES I TELL, which is to be his directorial debut.

20 short films from Southeast Asia will be in competition for SeaShorts Award, with Filipino filmmaker Lav Diaz as the head the jury.

ps: maybe you starting to have this suspicion, it seems like #SeaShortsonly work with good looking people...

ANNOUNCING HEAD OF JURY FOR SEASHORTS AWARD by next new wave

Copy of Head of SeaShorts Competition Jury: Lav Diaz

20 short films from Southeast Asia will be in competition for SeaShorts Award, with Filipino filmmaker Lav Diaz as the head the jury.

A grand master of world cinema, Lav Diaz is an inspiration for many independent filmmakers not only in Southeast Asia, but through out the world.

Especially known for making very long film, in fact, holding records of a few longest narrative films ever made, he established a special sense of time in his cinema. Sometimes he refer to it as his "Malay Aesthetic". Often, Lav Diaz refers himself as Malay filmmaker.

When asked for a portrait photo, he just said, "Kindly pick my most embarrassing image from internet."

We tried very hard, and it’s impossible. We only found this embarrassingly good looking portraits by JAKE VERZOSA, and another photo with no credit.

Please meet our head of Jury, Lav Diaz!

3rd Southeast Asian Short Film Festival to be held in Malacca by next new wave

Question and answer session with young Cambodian filmmakers, moderated by the Cambodian programmer, Park Sungho (second from left).

Question and answer session with young Cambodian filmmakers, moderated by the Cambodian programmer, Park Sungho (second from left).

The 3rd Southeast Asian Short Film Festival, SeaShorts had announced their festival date to be September 25 to 29th this year in Malacca. The 5 days event including film screenings, there are also forum, masterclass, workshop, art exhibition and music performance by filmmakers

SeaShorts Film Festival have 2 competition categories. Philippine filmmaker Lav Diaz will head the jury for SeaShorts Award, with 20 Southeast Asian Short films competing; while Indonesian filmmaker Garin Nugroho will head the jury for Next New Wave Award, a category for Malaysian short films.

In the past the jury members including Rithy Panh(Cambodia), Mira Lesmana(Indonesia), Sharifah Amani(Malaysia), Liew Seng Tat and many more outstanding filmmakers from the region.

“For us, the most important things is to watch film on big screen together, “ said the founder and festival director Tan Chui Mui, “It is a gathering for Southeast Asian film programmers and filmmakers, watching films on big screen together, talking about films, getting to know each other and eventually working together. “

SeaShorts Film Festival started in year 2017. It screened 118 short films during the 4 days event in 3 venues in Jalan Panggung, Kuala Lumpur.  In year 2018, SeaShorts was held in Georgetown Penang, partnering with Georgetown Festival. 148 short films were shown. A few highlight of the program including a program “My Student Films”, consisted of short films made by filmmakers when they were students, programmed by Jacky Yeap; and special program “Salt Boy Return”, a series of 3 programs on short films about original people of Southeast Asia curated by Gertjan Zuilhof.

SeaShorts Competition is still calling for submission. The deadline is June 15th. To date, the festival had already received 221 submissions from all the Southeast Asian countries.

SeaShorts Competition is still calling for submission. The deadline is June 15th. To date, the festival had already received 221 submissions from all the Southeast Asian countries.

Seeds of Origin: A Review of 'Gerbong 1,2,3' and 'G-23' by next new wave

            What is it about cinema that make this medium so susceptible to reverential paeans to itself? What is it about celluloid spools, magnetic tapes, LaserDiscs, or the hyaline crispness of contemporary digital image that is able to continually hypnotize and afflict generations after generations with a deeply dysfunctional affection known as cinephilia? For many, the sparest of means — sun-splashed image from a projector radiating in a dark room — a first encounter, and unlikely the last, can hold sway a lifetime of cinephilic obsession akin to the very seismic, flattening, and all-conquering effect of a first love.

            The 2nd year of SeaShorts film festival begins brightly by turning obsessive reflection from subject to project. Taking place in the timeworn townscape of Georgetown, Penang, heritage spaces with its chaotic ramshackle appeal captivate the city for five days by playing host to a festival dedicated to showcasing the best of Southeast Asian short films. Perhaps ever-appropriately, the opening program, titled “My Student Film”, takes to task the physiological, if not metaphysical, preoccupation of Southeast Asian filmmakers. Through laborious curatorial work involving the collective effort of the entire region, 7 film school theses of well-established filmmakers the likes of Garin Nugroho, Aditya Assarat, Dain Said, and Anthony Chen are given a new lease of life, some revived from their moldy VHS tapes by Asian Film Archive. It’s a program that retreats into the past, but it’s not strictly nostalgic. The very tracery of such a series chronicles and contextualizes the developing sensibilities of these directors when they were young, discovering not the unraveling of mysteries and dramas of their new works, but their very genesis.

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            There are many outstanding films in the program, two of which concern cinema, one more spiritually while the other more explicitly. Garin Nugroho’s Gerbong 1, 2, 3, falls into the former category. Set in and around the railway stations in Indonesia, 2 men and a woman converse about illusion and reality, independence and American presence, life and death, and cinema and meaning. For a student work, Nugroho exhibits the very measure of a deft auteur-in-the-making, weaving intricate formalistic play with photoroman flourishes that wouldn't seem out of place in a Godardian work. But what is more impressive in Gerbong is the trigger of an archaeological element of cinema going back to the 19th century. One of the earliest forward-moving shots in the history of cinema — Passage d’un tunnel en chemin de fer pris de l’avant de la locomotive essentially a unidirectional shot taken from a moving locomotive train gliding across the tracks heading towards the Gare de Saint-Clair, filmed by the Lumière brothers in Lyon in 1898, is astonishingly revived again in Indonesia after close to a century.

             If nothing more than a metafilmic nod, Nugroho evokes this historical lineage with the line “Still remember the moments before the last train wagon went by?” If this further concretizes Lumières as a spiritual progenitor to Gerbong, Nugroho flatly challenges it in the next shot. At one point in the film, Nugroho slow-cranks the camera mounted on the train in an unbroken 360-degree turn, upending visually and historically any canonical overdetermination attempted on the film, leaving the young Indonesian man suspended in the skies as he runs after the train. Nugroho’s usage of slow-advancing train shots are also more sophisticated than what was available in the past. Narrative voiceover infiltrates tracking train shots, the tone constantly hovering in between fogs of illusion and reality, infusing the short with an opiate-like quality that perhaps Nugroho wants the cinema of Indonesia to break away from, hinting at some point the pervasive influence of American politics and media in the local landscape, evidenced when he intermixes local ink sketches with a photomontage of Ronald Reagan in competing sequences.

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            In the case of Anthony Chen’s G-23, the quintessence of youthful filmmaking’s sheer exaltation is at its full flourish. Falling into the latter category of more explicit cinephilic evocations, G-23 exhibits a young filmmaker’s enthusiastic exuberance for the medium. Made when Anthony was just 19, the short chronicles the story of three idiosyncratic city dwellers: a young Indian girl, an elderly man, and a middle-aged lady from the perspective of a lone ticket usher. It’s an array of social misfits who might very well wander into Tsai Ming Liang’s filmmography, particularly that of Goodbye, Dragon Inn. While Anthony’s various cinematic gestures aren’t coy in its awareness — the middle-aged lady is one detail away from doing a full Brigette Lin in Wong Kar Wai’s Chungking Express, contemplating over a lychee can instead of a pineapple can — the film, despite its effusive homage, remains central to the very pressure-cooker environment that typifies the megalopolis, interweaving the phenomenon of urbanite disaffection into a morosely funny Singaporean tale.

 

            These films represent touchstones in Southeast Asian film history. Anthony Chen would go on to make Ilo Ilo, and Garin Nugroho Opera Jawa. In that essence this series exhibits the nascent talent of the region already in the making. Not once do these works succumb to the temptation of vacuous pastiche, or worse, awed mimicry out of complete deference. Instead, there’s enough social and historical import palpable in the films in and of itself. With the sparest of means, the SeaShorts film festival has organized a program that captures the cinematic grace of the region, giving form to a collective dream where a dark light in an empty hall can create an international, intergenerational, intertextual, and intraregional echo chamber of cinema and longing in Southeast Asia.

 

 

 

Wei Jie Lim is a freelance filmmaker, screenwriter, programmer, writer, and photographer based in Malaysia and Southeast Asia. He is a graduate of the Tisch School of Arts, NYU with a double major in Film/TV Production and Philosophy.

Elise's Journal of SeaShorts 2018 by next new wave

A Year and It's Cycle Opens to Something New.

Written by Elise Shick

A year just completed its cycle in the blink of an eye and here I am, standing in front of the audience crowd, announcing our failed Indiegogo campaign for SeaShorts Film Festival 2018.

Thanks Rou Ning for this indistinct photo.

Thanks Rou Ning for this indistinct photo.

Despite this fact, we still make the festival real, just with additional starvations added to our daily diet since the core team members have been working for nearly six months for a month's pay.

It's okay. We would always convince ourselves saying that everything's okay. We are learning and gaining experiences. We are friends, we have to starve together. That sounds more moving. But to be honest, life is really not easy when you had to think twice before ordering a roti canai.

Looking back at all the preparations we've done throughout the past months, I'm both shocked and overwhelmed. We've been paying ourselves with our efforts, sweats, and tears. Family don't really understand why we are organizing a film festival without pay; some friends couldn't see why we worked our asses off for such an 'insignificant' festival. But really, we swallowed all that and kept moving forward.

Our festival guests.

Our festival guests.

Today, the core team members stood in front of the invited guests, still feeling motivated even though exhausted while smelling a scent of freshness from the audience crowd. Each and every audience's look of excitement, a smile, or even an applause sufficed all the hard work.

Zai Kuning and Darrel Chia are enjoying the view of a dugong tree.

Zai Kuning and Darrel Chia are enjoying the view of a dugong tree.

SeaShorts 2018 had officially started on the 1st of August at 20:00 in conjunction and in partnership with George Town Festival. We are honored to have Amir Muhammad as our emcee for opening ceremony (as usual). As usual, he made jokes. Jokes that would make you laugh whether they were funny or not.

Mr. Horikawa Koichi from our sponsor Japan Foundation Asia Center is giving his opening speech.

Mr. Horikawa Koichi from our sponsor Japan Foundation Asia Center is giving his opening speech.

The opening ceremony proceeded with the screening of Chloe's Confession of A Programmer–a 20-minute film that comprises a series of interviews with some SeaShorts 2018 film programmers, including Jacky Yeap (Malaysia), Gertjan Zuilhof (The Netherlands), Thomas Barker (Australia), Leong Pui Yee (Singapore), Sanchai Chotirosseranee (Thailand), and Koyo Yamashita (Japan).

Chloe is watching her audience watching her film.

Chloe is watching her audience watching her film.

With the abstract music composed by Syukri, the film looks a little bit like an interrogation of CSI or any of that sort but a more friendly and intimate kind. One of the most amusing questions I found in this film was 'What if there's no cinema?' and while answering, Pui Yee laughed. While many lights have been shed on filmmakers, Chloe brought the less rewarding programmers to the big screen where they revealed and laughed at their dark secrets.

Liew Seng Tat is talking about his student film  Don't Play Play .

Liew Seng Tat is talking about his student film Don't Play Play.

Jacky's programme 'My Student Film' served as the opening films. The programme featured the works of the now-established filmmakers' student works, dated decades back, including the works of Dain Said, Anthony Chen, Garin Nugroho, Sherad Anthony Sanchez, Edwin, Aditya Assarat, and Liew Seng Tat. The films were old but managed to survive the test of time. To Seng Tat's request, an audience gave him a cigarette. Seng Tat, who was reddened by few cups of red wine, lightened a cigarette while answering questions from the floor.

Pimpaka Towira is explaining the making of  The Purple Kingdom

Pimpaka Towira is explaining the making of The Purple Kingdom

'Return of Salt Boy 1' was an exquisite curation programmed by Gertjan Zuilhof to emphasize on the indigenous communities in Southeast Asia. The programme had much to say about the forgotten people and people who disappeared with unjustified reason. Pimpaka's The Purple Kingdom was one of these films. 

Q&A session of 'Return of Salt Boy 1'.

Q&A session of 'Return of Salt Boy 1'.

The screening ended after 00:00 and the audiences were still actively posing questions at Pimpaka. The film wasn't just about a wife seeking for the truth of her husband's death but also about the director's careful observation of this specific group of native that opened up another scope of view for films to blend in documentary and fiction with personal and genuine human connection between the outsider (the filmmakers) and the insider (the subjects).

Keenen carries the easel back to hotel.

Keenen carries the easel back to hotel.

The street was empty and the moon shone brightly by the time when the screening ended. We walked 24 minutes back to hotel while carrying an easel (for set up and deco purposes). Penang was lovely at night. The sound of TVs could still be heard outside of these old buildings. I peeked into the window of an old house and saw an old man watching a TV. 

And me, as an outsider, got to catch a glimpse of his life. 

Bus and Its Spatial Sense: A Story of Ayuh BerSeaShorts by next new wave

Written by Elise Shick

Many things can happen on a bus, regardless its a spacious or a squeezy one. I said so because I used to take buses to travel between my hometown Johor and Kuala Lumpur. During my university years, twice a week, back and forth. Does this sound familiar to you?

The layout of the space in the bus is highly related to the interaction between the passengers, the bus conductor, the bus driver, and...the bus. Some people name this 'feng shui'. The bus driver always sits in the front with his back facing the passengers. Through the rear mirror, his voyeuristic gaze creates an almost detached relationship from the passenger. He gets to know what the passengers are doing but we know nothing of him. To break the speed limit or not, he has the choice. Isolated in the front and staying in his own bubble, he plays his favourite song list and sings on top of his lungs while taking charge of 40 people's lives.

The bus conductor can probably be a more approachable person compared to the bus driver. Sometimes he flirts with the passengers, sometimes the vice-versa. He walks past each row and checks the number of passengers who board the bus and whether or not any of them is left out at the R&R. I was once left at the R&R and the bus departed without me. This experience taught me how to spot a dutiful bus conductor.

Who will be your neighbours on the bus, that's definitely a matter of luck. The passengers sitting next to you, in front, and behind of you can either brighten up your day or destroy it. I call them 'neighbours by chance, once in a lifetime'. Some neighbours smell good. I call this the best luck you can have. Some treat you as invisible so they push their seat really far behind or squeeze you to the side to confine you to your own warm corner. Some kick your seat while listening to the music with their headphones. Some love, really love to speak on the phone loudly on the bus and everyone gets to know their intimate or cheesy conversations, or kids get to learn a lot of swear words.

There are times too when you board the 'right' bus with loveable neighbours and wish that the bus will never reach the destination. Eye candies, cute toddlers, people with a heart who embrace the space given to their seat and respect other people's territory. They make the bus driver happy and the bus conductor less difficult. The whole bus sparks with a positive vibe. Yes, this kind of happy bus does exist. Rarely.

SeaShorts team has been brainstorming to 'design' a happy bus for festival-goers who will travel to George Town from KL on Ayuh BerSeaShorts, with several protocols in mind:

1: No authoritarian bus driver. Song list will be meticulously picked by different Southeast Asian programmers who (some of them) will be riding on this bus too. Everyone can sing along on top of their lungs.

2: Someone friendly, good in maths, and not a flirtatious must be present to make sure no one will be left at the R&R.

3. Festival-goers who hop on Ayuh BerSeaShorts will probably get to know about the organizing team better than anyone else. While wondering what is the significance of your attendance at this festival, you will know what is the significance of having this festival in the first place, at least from the organizing team's point of view.

4. This ride from KL to George Town isn't a sight-seeing bus but a journey to discover some dark secrets the festival programmers have. Chloe Yap (one of our festival programmers) and occasionally with the presence of our publicity manager Elise Shick, have conducted several private interviews with the festival programmers. With tender and ruthless cuts combining dedication, Chloe comes up with a session called  'Confession of A Programmer'. You can watch this on the bus first before really start talking to the programmers, only if you really want to.

5. Anyone who hops on Ayuh BerSeaShorts can participate in the 'What Is Short Film To You' challenge, in which a team (individual or collective) is challenged to make a maximum ONE-MINUTE short film. Content is free for you to explore. 15 short films (on first come first served basis) will be screened during the closing ceremony. You can talk about short film, filmmaking, your experience during the festival, your dark secrets too as an exchange for 'Confession of A Programmer', or something else that surprises us.

6. Once you join Ayuh BerSeaShorts, your seat will be secured at opening and closing (award announcement) ceremonies.

For some neighbours (passengers), I met them only once in a lifetime on the bus. For Ayuh BerSeaShorts, we hope that this 'once-in-a-lifetime neighbour' can develop into something more. Be it friendship, mentorship, love or enmity (at least you know whom you don't want to be with on the bus next time).

 Click here to join Ayuh BerSeaShorts! 





 

Zai Kuning is coming to George Town, and a live music performance with Kamal Sabran!!!!! by next new wave

In his program Return of the Salt Boy, Programmer Gertjan Zuilhof had programed Zai Ruda Kuning's Riau, a 30 minutes documentary on the Orang Laut (Sea Gypsies) in the Riau Archipelago, part of Zai Kuning’s long-term research.

We had heard a lot about the legendary Zai Kuning, and really excited to hear that he is coming to SeaShorts.

And he wrote to us, "I am now become more relax after the big show recently down and waiting getting ready for Japan in october. just this 2 days i am made aware of the festival you guys put together via email and Fb. i am excited and have block up my date to be there a week for a kind of holiday treat for me. Here i have some thought and probably proposal. Since past 3 month beside the big sculpture i do edit and rework or extend the film RIAU to a 70Min video/film. edit for live music. it is an extension of my work of 17 years journey. I did the screening and live music performance. So i am wondering if the organiser will be interested to screen this film with me playing the music and be good to have 1 malaysian musician i know Kamal Sabran....."

Of course we said yes!

And now we want to announce to you that we are going to have this music performance by Zai Kuning and Kamal Sabran in #SeaShorts2018. More shall be revealed soon!

................Chronicles of Amnesia....................

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Over the past 18 years, Zai Kuning's fascination with the forgotten and misunderstood history of the Malay world has brought him onto a journey that stretches across the maritime realm of Sumatra, Riau Archipelago, up to the Andaman Sea.

Chronicles of Amnesia is a documentation of his search for the enigmatic orang laut (sea people), encounters with a troupe struggling to sustain the tradition of ancient Malay opera Mak Yong, and discovery of the forgotten king, Dapunta Hyang Srijayanasa from the 7th-century Srivijayan empire.

Chronicles of Amnesia is currently shown as a work in progress, as the artist continues to explores its music composition over the next 2 years.

If you want to know more about Zai Kuning, go to this:
http://dapuntahyang.com

This is Not A Film by Khavn by next new wave

Some filmmakers are crazy . That's common. But not many are as crazy as Khavn De La Cruz.

Some programmers are wild, that is unusual, but it happens. But still none quite as notorious as Gertjan Zuilhof.

Some filmmakers make a new film especially for a program, that's common when there is a commission and funding.

But it is quite special when a filmmake make a new film for a programmer, for a very small festival, without commision. It happens when you have some crazy people working together.

So now we will have World Premiere of this very special film. It is world premiere because Khavn just made it, and maybe still making it.

Come and watch it at #Seashorts2018, Aug 1-5, George Town.

Directed by: Khavn De La Cruz (The Philippines)
Film Title: Juan Tamad Goes To The Moon (1898) (2018)


Synopsis:
Three years before George Melies' "Le Voyage dans la Lune" and ten years before Segundo de Chomon's "Excursion En La Luna", indigenous proto-surrealist Philippine filmmaker Narding Salome Exelsio made "Nagtungo si Juan Tamad sa Buwan" in 1898 while the Philippines was being sold by Spain to American for twenty million dollars (VAT not included).

About the director:
Khavn is the great great grandson of Narding Salome Exelsio (1883-1949). He is currently the president of the Southeast Asian Institute of Pataphysics (SEAIP) and the founder of the Museum of Incoherent Cinematography (MIC).

The stories behind "My Student Films" by next new wave

It was not easy to curate a program like this. And it was a great idea from Jacky Yeap. He worked very hard to get all these short films.

"I actually talked to a friend not long ago wishing to see a festival that features student works of filmmakers. " Apitchapong replied to our invitation. He was very happy to hear about this program, and offered his short film. It was unfortunate that our screening facilities cannot show DCP, and we do not have funding to solve this problem. 

And we heard from Lav Diaz that he did three shorts when he was at the Mowelfund Film Institute, where he attended a film workshop. Only one survived ( he think they still have a copy of it). The other two, he lost them. We are still trying very hard to contact Mowelfund Film Institute.

And It took us sometime to get this mouldy beta tape from Dain Said, and with sponsorship of the Asian Film Archive in Singapore, we managed to get a digital copy.

So, please grab this opportunity to watch this first time ever, a collection of student short films by the young Dain SaidGarin Nugroho RiyantoAditya AssaratLiew Seng TatEdwin Blindpig, and many others!

Follow us for more stories from SeaShorts:
https://www.facebook.com/seashortsmy/

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We are crowdfunding!
https://igg.me/at/seashortsmalaysia
Follow us on Instagram: 
https://www.instagram.com/seashortsmy/ or @seashortsmy

Surabaya Johny, After All These Years by next new wave

narrated by Tan Chui Mui

A few months back, I found this small book on Yin Shao Loong's bookshelf called "Surabaya Johny".

I only it knew as songtitle. And I didn't know Dain Said wrote a book in the same title. 

And things became even more interesting when i found out it is actually about this film he did, both a mockumentary and film noir. I wanted to show it in our film club.

I asked Dain. He was surprised how I knew about this film. And then he promised to look for the copy. 

"I am trying to locate and see wether there is more than just a film copy ( 16mm) or if I have a ( I know this is ridiculous) a tape copy, either Beta Tape or 1 inch tape....much of my film and negs have either been mouldy or melted in this tropical heat..... but should I do have it the I will let you know...I know that I have a vhs copy somewhere. "

Yin Shao Loong said he has a VHS copy of it in his parent's place, where he took from KOMAS. but he could not find it anymore. He suspected his mom had threw it because it was full of fungus.

This is a tropical problem. The humidity is really not good for film archive. 

When Jacky Yeap decided to make his "My Student Films" program for #SeaShorts2018, this short film seems so fitting. 

And Dain, in the midst of moving house, finally located his copy.

"Can we meet up n talk, cos I need to correct a mistake in the spoken narrative, ....which then affects the voice cos my voice is a lot older, I have found the beta copy last week as we r moving n I am packing n found the beta tape version with a little mold on the sides."

This is the beta tape we got. And we took this photo, to show the condition of the tape for the kind people in Asian Film Archive, to see if it is still possible to transfer or digitize it. They were very doubtful, but asked us to courier the tape anyway. 

We took this photo to email to Asian Film Archive to see if it is even worthwhile to courier them the digital beta tape. Look at the mold!!!!

We took this photo to email to Asian Film Archive to see if it is even worthwhile to courier them the digital beta tape. Look at the mold!!!!

 

And after a few weeks, we received their email saying the copy is done. I still had not seen the film myself, because I want to keep the experience of watching it on big screen during SeaShorts.

And I like this photo of the moldy tape so much, because it said something about us the tropical filmmakers: the humidity, the heat, and living for the moment, and really not care too much about immortality, hehe.

Luckily we have Singaporean who will think ahead and actually archive films for us. 

Other filmmakers in the "My Student Films" program are: Garin NugrohoLiew Seng TatEdwin BlindpigAditya Assarat

BTW, we are also crowdfunding to help run the festival, Please support us, or at the least help us pay for the courier or shipping of screening materials: https://igg.me/at/seashortsmalaysia/x

My Student Film: Things That We Recalled... by next new wave

Jacky, the programmer of the programme My Student Film, spoke to the five established filmmakers to ask what they recalled when they were making their student films.

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At that time students did not have enough money to buy 8mm raw materials, so we bought the cheap material illegally from someone who worked at National TV station. Shooting on a train was also without permission, we did it stealthily.

-Garin Nugroho (Indonesia) 
The director of Wagon 1.2,3 / Gerbong 1,2,3

 

Seng Tat: 'This animation is the final year project of my animation course at Multimedia University. It was a group project done together with my 3 other classmates; Jun Wei, Terence, and Eddie. I’ve not seen them for a long long time. Hope they are still alive and well.'

Chui Mui: 'This animation did not finish rendering. And it is edited from playblast video. That's because the rendering crashed whenever Seng Tat goes near the computer. Seng Tat was a curse. We don't let him go near the Rendering machine' 

Seng Tat: 'That's not true. The entire animation was rendered. Only 1 shot was a playblast shot.'

Chui Mui: 'I See. Maybe I remember wrongly.

-Liew Seng Tat (Malaysia)
The director of Don't Play Play 

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I started film school really early. 17 in fact. I shot 'G-23' when I was 19 as part of my graduation film at Ngee Ann Polytechnic's School of Film and Media Studies. We shot it on 16mm. I really do miss shooting on film. At that time, there wasn't even video assist available at the school. So there was no video monitor to look at what one was shooting and no way of playing back takes. It was pure trust and instinct of what you are capturing right before your eyes. I almost feel some of that discipline gets thrown out the window with the digitalisation of the medium. Now we get so used to watching 'playback' so much.

-Anthony Chen (Singapore)
The director of G23

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I had a tutor who hated me and I think he was responsible for this event; I went out for coffee, and when I came back at the premiere my friends told me that a group of dark-suited Indonesian men in a black Mercedes, came out and started shouting and haranguing the screen where the trailer of 'Surabaya Johnny' was playing. A few years ago when the 'Act Of Killing' was made his name was in the credits as one of the producers.

-Dain Said (Malaysia)
The director of Surabaya Johny

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It's a Film when I was a sophomore at the university and was done as a class exercise. It was shown in Rotterdam almost (if my memory did not deny it) with an end credits saying 'Sorry Quark (name of teacher), for submitting late!'

-Sherad Anthony Sanchez (The Philippines)
The director of Apple

As an amateur filmmaker, these words struck Jacky with a thought: 'I am what they were. 20 years ago.'

SEASHORTS 2018: We Only Focus on Short Films. Why? by next new wave

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It is often believed that short film is a gateway to the feature film, an idea, or a presentation of the form. Like a prototype. Shorter version of the longer form... Cinema, but bite-sized...?

That can be true. But to some filmmakers, they can be something else entirely; they are a form for expression and experimentation. The short film, perhaps, can be imagined as a malleable form that can easily be broken, molded or bent. A shapeshifting form, that can shapeshift into different objects.

Imagine the short film as a game of Limitation. Each short film can be a new door that opens to… anything. Confined of course, within the choice of duration between 1 second to 30 minutes. The shorter the duration, the less you have, the more you are forced to be creative. Other choices of limitation varies from the number of locations, characters, yes or no dialogue, shots, day or night, yes or no sound, fiction or non-fiction; and many more. Unconfined by the same rules as a feature-length film, in this game the filmmaker chooses what to focus on - space, image, words, a place, a person, an idea....

We believe that the existence of SEASHORTS offers a platform to showcase the results of the filmmakers’ different methods of play.

-Chloe Yap Mun Yee
A Brief Note on Short Films and Within

2nd SeaShorts Film Festival to be held in George Town, Penang by next new wave

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KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - Next New Wave announces its second annual SeaShorts film festival to be held from August 1st to 5th in partnership with George Town Festival, Penang. 

During the 5 days of the festival, there will be a screening of special programs, notably S-Express, an annual collaboration of short film programs from 8 participating countries (Thailand, Singapore, Indonesia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Malaysia, Philippines, Vietnam) and is an insight to the developments of filmmaking in the region. 

SeaShorts will also feature short films by Southeast Asian filmmakers such as Garin Nugroho, Riri Riza, Liew Seng Tat, Edwin, Pimpaka Towira, and Zai Kuning. 

Last year, the festival screened 118 short films from 10 Southeast Asian countries, with audiences mainly consisting of film curators and filmmakers. The films are from Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Cambodia, Myanmar, Vietnam, Brunei, Laos and Malaysia.

 

Film screening during SeaShorts. The audience was mainly international curators and filmmakers.

Film screening during SeaShorts. The audience was mainly international curators and filmmakers.

SeaShorts is small but international. The festival guests came from Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, Myanmar, Brunei and Japan. 

SeaShorts is small but international. The festival guests came from Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, Myanmar, Brunei and Japan. 

Yuni Hadi shared her experience as festival director of Singapore International Film Festival. A panel with film festival directors from different Southeast Asian countries: from left to right, Thaidi from Wathann Film Festival Myanmar, Yuni Hadi, Amir Muhammad the moderator, Fransiska Prihadi   from Minikino Film Festival Bali, Calida from Thai Short Film and Video Film Festival.

Yuni Hadi shared her experience as festival director of Singapore International Film Festival. A panel with film festival directors from different Southeast Asian countries: from left to right, Thaidi from Wathann Film Festival Myanmar, Yuni Hadi, Amir Muhammad the moderator, Fransiska Prihadi from Minikino Film Festival Bali, Calida from Thai Short Film and Video Film Festival.

Panel with the jury members of the Next New Wave Competition, Shanjhey Kumar Perumal, Sharifah Amani and Aditya Assarat, moderated by Umapagan. 

Panel with the jury members of the Next New Wave Competition, Shanjhey Kumar Perumal, Sharifah Amani and Aditya Assarat, moderated by Umapagan. 

The festival is currently calling for submission of short films from all Southeast Asian countries. 20 Southeast Asian short film entries will be selected by notable film curators for the SeaShorts Competition, and 10 Malaysian short film entries will be selected for Next New Wave Competition. The Juries of SeaShorts will be announced in April. 

Dear Filmmakers from Laos and Myanmar... by next new wave

SeaShorts started calling for submission on February 5th. In one month, we received 79 submissions. We are very happy to receive 26 submissions from Philippines!

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We are urging filmmakers from Laos and Myanmar to send us more films. 

Submit your short film to us!

Deadline: 3rd June 2018 (before 23:59 UTC/GMT).

Eligibility

-Director(s) must be from Southeast Asia.

-The short film submitted has not been premiered in any film festival before 1st June 2017.

-Country of production: Southeast Asian countries (fulfilled by at least two of these: film locations, core team members, main casts, or funding)

-Short film duration should not be more than 30 minutes, including credits

Submissions

-No fees required.

-The submission should be done by owner of the short film.

-All submissions must not breach any third party copy right (i.e. if you use commercial video, music or stills, please clear the copy right before submitting).

-Complete the entry form:

https://goo.gl/forms/iYKtW0ijeQtAApzm1

SeaShorts: Letters from Strangers by next new wave

What does a short film resemble? A knife, a letter, a window, a song?

Then what does a short film from Southeast Asia resemble? A rusted parang knife? A letter from home stained with tears? A shutter window that doesn't close well? A soft and slimy love song with heavy nasal tones?

August 1st to 5th, SeaShorts will be showing more than 100 short films in George Town.

Come and feel the bright and humid stories that feel so familiar to us yet so foreign at the same time.

Prior to SeaShorts, there will be a series of screenings in George Town.

  • Not 34 Film Club - 4th, 18th July
  • His Bus Depot - 3rd, 10th, 17th, 24th & 31st (Every Tuesday), July
  • Luma - 27th, 28th July

SeaShorts Film Festival Official Website: http://www.nextnewwave.com.my/seashorts2018/ 


东南亚短片节:

来自陌生国度的家书
那里的阳光一样明媚,空气一样潮湿

电影短片像什么?一把刀,一封信,一扇窗,一首歌?

来自东南亚国度的短片又像什么呢?一把生锈的巴冷刀,一封带泪的家书,一扇关不紧的百叶窗,一首呢喃不绝的情歌?

2018年8月1-5日,东南亚短片节(SeaShorts)将在于槟城乔治市放映超過100部東南亞短片。潮湿的空气,明媚的阳光,这些都是我们熟悉的声色影像,同时又是那么遥远而陌生。

短片节之前,乔治市会有多场节前放映,让槟城的朋友先来感受东南亚短片。

  • Not 34 Film Club - 4th, 18th July
  • His Bus Depot - 3rd, 10th, 17th, 24th & 31st (Every Tuesday), July
  • Luma - 27th, 28th July

东南亚短片节官网:http://www.nextnewwave.com.my/seashorts2018/

談:一號Ah May by next new wave

文/小樂 Jacky Yeap

我不太会说别人的故事,所以我说我自己的故事。

我是一个热爱女人的人,我很喜欢和女生讲话,也觉得和女生讲话有一种很平静的感觉,也许女生有一种温和感吧。所以我拍的故事常常都会和 [女生] 有关系。我想了想,原来不是因为想女生演我的戏,而是因为拍这部戏,我有机会和女演员讲话。

至于拍摄这部短片好像是注定的。那个时候,我已经开始编写这部短片的剧本。

我一直都很想拍关于一位年轻人和年纪比自己大的女人的爱情故事。我觉得社会很容易用不好的眼光对待这样的爱情,觉得一定是建立在某种利益上。

这里,我不是要为这样的人透过影像声援哦,我只是发现自己也处于这样的状态,所以想透过影像让自己看清自己。再说,我哪有资格为别人说话,连自己的事情都说不完了。然后那个时候我亲爱的老板(也是女的)就说要我拍一部短片。所以就这样,就马上在一个月以内就完成了,因为剧本本来就快定稿了。

故事的发展和演员的发展是不一样的。

我感觉自己是很自私的,因为我抛弃了演员心理的发展,而把所有故事的发展建立在场景里。我经过了一些地方,我觉得对这些地方还是这个环境很有感觉,觉得想在这里拍戏,所以我就会硬硬的让这两个角色出现在这里。当然,硬硬的话就会很奇怪,还是需要合情合理,但是身为导演的objective,就是要在这里拍就对了。

我喜欢你,刘淑琳

这好像变成了我拍电影的目的了。我在修读大学的时候很喜欢一个女孩子,她叫刘淑琳。她是修读音乐系的,我那个时候常常呆在图书馆到很夜,编写电影论文。因为砂拉越大学的图书馆是全马营业最久的,每天都是到半夜12点才关,所以每次我回去的时候,整个图书馆都快没人了,大大的图书馆,只有两三个人,是有点恐怖的。回去了时候,我常常都会听到远方飘来音乐声。我就在想,谁还在练习呢,因为音乐室的距离和图书馆是最靠近的,所以是可以听到了。我就经过那长长又暗暗的走廊,我偷偷的打开那道门,她一个人在练习,我就站在外面偷听。一日一日的,好像变成了习惯,也喜欢上她了。

可是三年里,我没能和她说,也说不出口。所以我希望用我暂时最有信心的事情,拍电影来传达我喜欢她这件事情。所以从今以后,这也成为了我拍电影的目的,希望有一天她会看到这些影片。

所以,这部短片的诞生,就是结合了以上的几个目的,而存在这样的短片。