Riri Riza, Indonesian filmmaker (Gie / Three Days to Forever / ATAMBUA 39° Celsius)
       
     
Nicole Midori Woodford, Singaporean filmmaker
       
     
Aw See Wee, Malaysian filmmaker
       
     
Yuni Hadi, festival director of Singapore International Film Festival
       
     
Syukri A. Rahim, young filmmaker
       
     
Yoon Choi, filmmaker and former director of Busan Film Commission​
       
     
Alfonse Chiu, film critic
       
     
Audrie Yeo, a filmmaker trying to be a filmmaker
       
     
Zai Kuning, artist and filmmaker
       
     
Gertjan Zuilhof, art historian, critic, programmer, drawer, and traveller
       
     
Fransiska Prihadi, programme director at Minikino
       
     
Aditya Assarat, father of three monkeys
       
     
Thomas Barker, head of film and television at University of Nottingham Malaysia
       
     
Yow Chong Lee
       
     
Megan Wonowidjoyo, filmmaker, artist, and lecturer at the faculty of cinematic arts of Multimedia University
       
     
Isazaly Isa, post producer, editor, and trainer
       
     
Isyraqi Yahya, film graduate of UiTM
       
     
Riri Riza, Indonesian filmmaker (Gie / Three Days to Forever / ATAMBUA 39° Celsius)
       
     
Riri Riza, Indonesian filmmaker (Gie / Three Days to Forever / ATAMBUA 39° Celsius)

“I had wonderful days filled with a great selection of shorts and dialogue with like-minded peers in the warm ambience of Penang; all of which made me realise the great future of Southeast Asian film.

It is the best place to watch and understand the current state of the region’s cinema in a friendly environment.”

Nicole Midori Woodford, Singaporean filmmaker
       
     
Nicole Midori Woodford, Singaporean filmmaker

“Watching short films by other SEA filmmakers at SeaShorts was an intimate and great way to get to know them as well as the audience.

SeaShorts as a festival truly captures the essence of SEA cinema in its love for films, late night suppers/post-screening discussions and communal exchange of ideas within the region.”

Aw See Wee, Malaysian filmmaker
       
     
Aw See Wee, Malaysian filmmaker

“A very well-organised film festival that connects filmmakers, film lovers, audiences, and film industry people together! The best film festival in Malaysia!”

Yuni Hadi, festival director of Singapore International Film Festival
       
     
Yuni Hadi, festival director of Singapore International Film Festival

“I started being exposed to short films in my teens and discovering Southeast Asian works allowed me to see all the stories from our neighbouring countries that are so close to us. Even though we are different, we share many things in our cultural palate. We become richer for it and I am so glad SeaShorts Film Festival is presented annually in Malaysia to showcase this.”

Syukri A. Rahim, young filmmaker
       
     
Syukri A. Rahim, young filmmaker

“I love the whole experience of being at SeaShorts because it taught me about the importance of relationships between filmmakers and how it should be strengthened, especially among those in Southeast Asia.

A very unique film festival that has its charms by offering a platform to filmmakers across the region to connect and showcase their work in an inclusive environment regardless of who you are.”

Yoon Choi, filmmaker and former director of Busan Film Commission​
       
     
Yoon Choi, filmmaker and former director of Busan Film Commission​

“The SeaShorts Film Festival was like a vacation to me. It gave me the energy to start a new movie.

Movies begin with small, simple, humble ideas. Making movies also starts from the moment you first come across a camera. Being a filmmaker also starts with meeting movie lovers. In that sense, the SeaShorts Film Festival is a beautiful starting point for expanding the future. I've been to the Festival for the last two years and am very sorry to not attend this year. As a filmmaker, I also want to be with you (Asian filmmakers) all the time.”

Alfonse Chiu, film critic
       
     
Alfonse Chiu, film critic

“A lovely, intimate experience that really showed a deep love for Southeast Asian cinema.

A labour of love since its inception, SeaShorts is one of those rare film festivals where the scrappy can-do spirit of independent filmmakers is embodied in every second of its existence. There is no other better place to be, if you are genuinely passionate about Southeast Asian short films.”

Alfonse Chiu is a cultural journalist and film critic based in Singapore.

Audrie Yeo, a filmmaker trying to be a filmmaker
       
     
Audrie Yeo, a filmmaker trying to be a filmmaker

“Pleasant, memorable, a super chill, and laidback film festival that showcases what Southeast Asian storytelling has to offer.”

Zai Kuning, artist and filmmaker
       
     
Zai Kuning, artist and filmmaker

“It is our duty and responsibility to know our stories through books and films. Make it a habit, not a hobby, to appreciate them so that they are not eschewed from our future. Only we can ensure our culture is preserved and understood.

I wish I could join you in Malacca as my grandparents were Chinese Peranakan from the state.”

Gertjan Zuilhof, art historian, critic, programmer, drawer, and traveller
       
     
Gertjan Zuilhof, art historian, critic, programmer, drawer, and traveller

“SeaShorts is a festival akin to Independence Day for the Southeast Asian family.

To young Malaysian filmmakers, I would say: If I were you, I would not care about the old programmers and filmmakers. I would only be interested in the works of fellow peers, because they will have to solve—or maybe have solved—the same problems as I once had to as well.”

Fransiska Prihadi, programme director at Minikino
       
     
Fransiska Prihadi, programme director at Minikino

“Sweet! A great chance to sample Southeast Asian shorts.”

Aditya Assarat, father of three monkeys
       
     
Aditya Assarat, father of three monkeys

“I love the food in Penang last year and the films were great! It is truly a Festival of films, friends, and food!”

Thomas Barker, head of film and television at University of Nottingham Malaysia
       
     
Thomas Barker, head of film and television at University of Nottingham Malaysia

“Always surprised by the unexpected short film gems and their makers. In the immortal words of Paul Kelly: From little things, big things grow.”

Yow Chong Lee
       
     
Yow Chong Lee

“I came to know SeaShorts through Jacky Yeap, the programming manager of SeaShorts. The Festival provides a capsule of Southeast Asian cinema, at least in its shorter form in a fun and engaging manner.

I am hoping both SeaShorts and Southeast Asian cinema become identifiable, if not inseparable, in Malaysia.

Furthermore, I feel at home having attended SeaShorts two years in a row. The atmosphere it brings is just so accepting, surrounded by young filmmakers, programmers, and audiences who love films to their fullest.

Without which, I will not be able to bring films shown in SeaShorts back and share with audiences in Sarawak.

Seeing SeaShorts grow as it is today, it instils my belief that, people behind (and in front) of the film festival will once again make it an event to remember.

See you all soon 🌿”

Megan Wonowidjoyo, filmmaker, artist, and lecturer at the faculty of cinematic arts of Multimedia University
       
     
Megan Wonowidjoyo, filmmaker, artist, and lecturer at the faculty of cinematic arts of Multimedia University

“I joined SeaShorts 2018 in Penang, and loved the friendly atmosphere where filmmakers, programmers and, critics all gather as one big family because we love film.

SeaShorts is the Malaysian New Wave bringing together a Southeast Asian film community in Malaysia.”

Isazaly Isa, post producer, editor, and trainer
       
     
Isazaly Isa, post producer, editor, and trainer

“SeaShorts is a place to meet filmmakers and share ideas and stories off-screen. Miss this festival and you will miss the wholesome greatness of film.”

Isyraqi Yahya, film graduate of UiTM
       
     
Isyraqi Yahya, film graduate of UiTM

“I was a filmmaker previously, but low confidence and self-uncertainty did a number on my ambition and drive. This is in addition to my problems with public speaking too. My friend told to attend SeaShorts to perhaps find inspiration. Through my participation in the S-Express Malaysia programme, I was able to join all the events.

I met many famous people at the festival such as Riri Riza, Mira Lesmana, Dain Said, and of course, Rithy Panh! I’ve written film analyses about them for college work, but to see them before my eyes and even talk with them, was unbelievable.

I had lots of ideas and inspiration while watching the short films and listening to the sharing sessions. After each screening, I felt that these works were beautiful due to their uniqueness of geography, culture, and folklore.

Interestingly, there was an event called “Evening with Young Filmmakers”, a relaxed session where we were able to share the good and bad of our careers to date. Our discussion motivated me to become better.

Most importantly, the Festival built strong friendships between audiences and filmmakers. Perhaps this bond is such because we have similar interests and personalities. We talked about our cultures, film history, politics, love, and sentimental values. Until today, I am still in contact with some of them.

Hi Petrus! Kevin! Carl! Margarite! Patipol! Kritsade! Ryandi! Roufy! Bennial! Xue Li! Miss you all! Although the location was small, it felt like we went to an international film festival. My lecturer, a regular at such events, concurred.

The Festival went beyond my expectations! I couldn’t sleep well throughout the nights due to my excitement. While SeaShorts did not help with my public speaking, I am now more motivated and raring to show my stuff to the world.

Martin Scorsese has mentioned the works of Filipino director, Lino Brocka, as one of his influences. Unfortunately, there are not many screenings of Southeast Asian films around here. Most of the film schools also touch very little on the subject.

How lucky we are then to have SeaShorts that gathers the best filmmakers from the region (and Europe too). Film students should grab this great chance to gain new knowledge, brush up on techniques, and discover different perspectives.

This is one experience we won’t get in school. For filmmakers, they can learn the secrets in getting their films to bigger film festivals the likes of Cannes, Busan, and Sundance. For everyone else, it is an opportunity to get inspired by the people and ideas that make this Festival great.”